The Place Where Everything is Broken

The Place Where Everything is Broken

by Guest Blogger February 22, 2018

It’s easier to leave the poem behind, label it “failed,” and write something completely different. I have come to realize the cowardice of sidestepping revision. The word revision means to “see again” and my vocation as a writer is wrapped up in this process. 

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Fluorescent by Jessica Yuan

Fluorescent by Jessica Yuan

by Ruminate Magazine February 21, 2018 1 Comment

Jessica Yuan's poem "Fluorescent" appears in Issue No. 46: A Way Through

It took years to arrive and your eyes 

became accustomed to light at all hours,

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Researchers Find the Birth of Civilization in a Nutshell

Researchers Find the Birth of Civilization in a Nutshell

by Guest Blogger February 20, 2018

In Orion, ionized clouds larger than cities and planets billow into space. Stars swarm and explode in a glorious million-year dance. The scientists and reporters say all of life’s ingredients are there. Before I knew of science, my eyes taught me the ways of the cosmos. I could look up at the night and feel at home. 

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The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History

The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History

by Guest Blogger February 15, 2018 3 Comments

At the moment, the assumption to question is that we humans have a right to be on earth and that it will indefinitely support us. When the very ground is taken from beneath our feet, where can we stand? What is left to us, when the familiar forms of our physical existence are taken away? Nothing, perhaps—yet I wonder.

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It Is This by Craig Reinbold

It Is This by Craig Reinbold

by Ruminate Magazine February 14, 2018 11 Comments

I would charge that tree at sixty miles per hour, the following curve rated for thirty-five. Headed home after school, in the after-practice gloam, in the dark after work—to turn, or not to turn? That was the question. It was an option. Something to consider. I suspect most of us don’t think of this as a decision, per se, but it is. Every day, we decide, even if for most of us the answer has become reflex.

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The Blessing and Burden of Knowledge

The Blessing and Burden of Knowledge

by Gyasi Byng February 13, 2018 1 Comment

Do I enjoy having this knowledge about myself? The knowledge that I have anxiety and another bout of depression could be waiting a few months down the road? No, I can’t say that I do....However, knowing that I will eventually have a good day and I will come out of my depression has steadied me.

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What Death Teaches Us About Living

What Death Teaches Us About Living

by Guest Blogger February 08, 2018

While preparing for the eventual loss of loved ones, we might spend time wondering if there are certain things we want to tell them. We might reflect on their roles in our lives, and how life will be after they depart. Being by someone’s deathbed might also lend itself to contemplation, and musings that we may not normally think about at any other time.

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Review of The Divine Magnet

Review of The Divine Magnet

by Guest Blogger February 06, 2018 2 Comments

Niemeyer foregrounds the ways the letters reflect the writer’s intense moral and spiritual concerns. “That these letters … read much like homilies is a key to their power and genius,” he claims, departing without apology from those who find them more manic than ministerial.

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On Masculinity

On Masculinity

by Aaron Brown February 01, 2018 1 Comment

That is what I’m after—a restorative, not restrictive, maleness. This has been my prayer over the last year—long before the headlines of masculine failure flashed across our screens—a simple and direct prayer: Lord, what is in me that is not of you, rid me of it.

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Reading for the Common Good

Reading for the Common Good

by Guest Blogger January 30, 2018

In Reading for the Common Good, Smith explores the role—the necessity— of reading for the betterment of our individual lives, our churches, our neighborhoods, and ultimately the world...In a world pushing us to go go go…Smith invites us to slow down—to slow down and read.

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The Numinous Quality of Portraiture

The Numinous Quality of Portraiture

by Guest Blogger January 25, 2018

There is something at the core of our shared human condition that infuses art. Art outlives people. And that is why it is particularly numinous when an artwork is created in the context of the end of life. It is the human attempt to throw off “oblivion’s blight.” 

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Staying Rooted in an Uprooted World

Staying Rooted in an Uprooted World

by Guest Blogger January 23, 2018

These days are full of acute, concentrated heaviness. We mourn and long, we hope and despair, constantly and all at once. That is, of course, the human condition, but it is exhausting, and it often leaves us feeling listless and unsettled. And so, we have to find rootedness.

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We're Hiring

We're Hiring

by Ruminate Magazine January 22, 2018

We’re searching for two editors to join our team—a fiction editor and a nonfiction editor. Both are part-time independent contractor positions that can be done remotely. Below are the details, if you’re interested. 

We strongly encourage people of color, women, LBGTQ folks, formerly incarcerated, and differently-abled people to apply.

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Maps without Us

Maps without Us

by Guest Blogger January 18, 2018

For my mother, the directions were gospel; for my father, suggestive. He would stare at the highlighted segment of roads, and then improvise to find alternative routes to our destination. Ones that might take us closer to a historical site or through a “scenic byway.” To my father, the maps could be both guide and reference.

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You Must Change Your Life

You Must Change Your Life

by Angela Doll Carlson January 16, 2018

 I must change my life, I thought. Is this what Rilke meant? That I should “get healthy?” I should eat better, drink better? I jumped to this conclusion in the aisle at my grocery store.

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On Having a Baby in the Age of Climate Change

On Having a Baby in the Age of Climate Change

by Guest Blogger January 11, 2018 4 Comments

I've had climate change anxiety since college, but bringing a baby into the universe intensifies it. My anxiety no longer only extends the length of my lifespan. I tell my husband Taylor I regret having a child because I can't stand the thought of Jackson in pain. He holds up our son’s wiggly, plump body. "You really wish he didn't exist?"

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Why It Takes a Village (Not a City) to Raise a Child

Why It Takes a Village (Not a City) to Raise a Child

by Guest Blogger January 09, 2018

I think what’s hard about cities is how we isolate ourselves in these constructed bubbles. We sound-proof our world, wearing headphones as we walk through the streets so we don’t have to talk to anyone....No one just sits on the streets to watch the world go by. No one has the time for that. So, I miss that about the village.

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From a balcony overlooking the El Yunque rainforest by Tonia Colleen Martin

From a balcony overlooking the El Yunque rainforest by Tonia Colleen Martin

by Guest Blogger January 06, 2018

Standing on the balcony overlooking the El Yunque rain forest, I remember the kitchen pinging with light. My father emerges from nowhere, slams me playfully against the wall. Placing his forearm against my throat, barely pressing because I know enough to freeze, while I plead with him to let me go, he grabs a knife from the silverware drawer. 

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Editors Ruminate: On the Poetry of Issue 45, Unfinished

Editors Ruminate: On the Poetry of Issue 45, Unfinished

by Kristin George Bagdanov January 04, 2018 2 Comments

...to finish, to be finished, is not a romantic, miraculous achievement, but a construct we impose upon our lives to produce some semblance of progress....The poems in this issue expose this tension, the potential and the anxiety present in the unfinished. They wrestle with the finality of death, the specter of memory, and the desire to change that which is not yet done.

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Ambition: Inquiries and Gentle Conclusions

Ambition: Inquiries and Gentle Conclusions

by Guest Blogger January 02, 2018

At the heart of this collection is a set of inquiries into the nature of ambition: Is it good, bad, or neutral? How might we best wield it?...Reassuringly, there is no Monolithic Christian Stance on ambition to be found here. Although every author is committed to both the Judeo-Christian tradition and the tradition of literary craft, they come to a plurality of gentle conclusions about the dilemma that ambition poses. 

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On Not Having Written Everything

On Not Having Written Everything

by Guest Blogger December 28, 2017

Artists are collages of experiences and relationships. A good work of art doesn't merely incubate in the artist but rather flourishes from the encouragement, interaction, criticism, or evaluation of others. Art of every kind is lonely work—but it's certainly not something we do alone. 

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Sanctuaries

Sanctuaries

by Guest Blogger December 26, 2017

Sanctuaries explores the places in which the spiritual and the human can touch….A sanctuary is thought of being solely for the sacred and the pious but it is also for the ordinary. The images that surround the idea of spirituality in American Christianity are articulated through very traditional symbolism and behaviors. This work challenges this practice by studying the way in which light interacts with mundane spaces and objects.

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Review of Getting to Gardisky Lake

Review of Getting to Gardisky Lake

by Guest Blogger December 21, 2017

As I carried Paul J. Willis 2016 collection, Getting to Gardisky Lake with me for the last several weeks, I found innumerable mantrams among the poems, grounding myself amidst Willis’ stories of the wilderness, the classroom, of aging and of loving. It seems there is nothing his poetry does not touch...

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Chronic Illness: The Power of Silence

Chronic Illness: The Power of Silence

by Catherine Hervey December 19, 2017 3 Comments

For the next several months I watched my own silence as though I had no power over it. I didn’t tell my boyfriend, though it might have been relevant to our conversations about getting married. I didn’t tell my mother back home, or anyone I worked with. I cut my foot fetching water, bled on the front steps, and said nothing to my sisters as they helped me clean it up.

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