Issue 34add title

the RUMINATE blog

Breathe Deep: On Worship, Snow Bikes, and the Great Beyond

Breathe Deep: On Worship, Snow Bikes, and the Great Beyond

All actual life is encounter.

Martin Buber

I live in a city so singular it helped birth and sustain a new winter sport. To be fair, snow bikes didn’t exactly originate in Marquette, Michigan, but part of their evolution, their expansion, has benefitted from local riders terrorizing the groomed trails running like arteries around town.

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It’s a Sign: Symbols in Literature and Life

It’s a Sign: Symbols in Literature and Life

The way I remember her, Mrs. Mell was a formidable, five foot tall (maybe), redheaded woman. What she didn’t have in height, she made up for in teaching acumen, knowledge, and demands on my fellow seventh and eighth grade English students and me. Under her tutelage, my understanding of literature, analytical skills, and ability to write were transformed and molded.

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Review of Epiphanies, by Kathleen L. Housley

Review of Epiphanies, by Kathleen L. Housley

Reviewed by Thom Satterlee

It may surprise some readers to find in the same collection poems about the Spanish flu, Leonardo da Vinci (both as artist and inventor), evolution, heart attacks, mathematics, Robert Frost (mostly by way of allusion and brief quotation), Greek mythology, psychiatric illness, and the martyrdom of Dietrich Bonhoeffer. However, the poet Kathleen L. Housley has a way of organizing her material so that dissimilarities and apparent randomness more or less vanish and leave us with common ground and orderliness.

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Review of Second Sky, by Tania Runyan

Review of Second Sky, by Tania Runyan

Reviewed by Katie Shara

In her book A Journey with Two Maps, Irish poet Eavan Boland asks, “When had poetry made that troublesome investment in separating the ordinary world—the small universe of the cup, the open door, the room—from the epic world of violence and civil struggle?” With Second Sky (Cascade Books, 2014), Tania Runyan joins the likes of Boland, Sylvia Plath, and other poets who affirm the power of the everyday in their work.

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Finding Peace in the Particulars: A Review of Particular Scandals, by Julie L. Moore

Finding Peace in the Particulars: A Review of Particular Scandals, by Julie L. Moore

Reviewed by Elise Kimball

When I first read the title Particular Scandals (Cascade Books, Poiema Poetry Series, 2013), I envisioned steamy revelations of past delinquencies, but when I finally opened the book, I found that these scandals refer to the mystical phenomena we encounter every day, the greatest scandal being that we would praise “nothing / for creating beauty / as particular as” hyacinth, huckleberry, and “Hopkins’ beloved bluebell.”

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Data Ocean Swimming

Data Ocean Swimming

I dropped my laptop this morning. It made this awful beeping sound while the drive whirred and lights blinked frenetically, followed by what seemed almost like gears grinding, though I am certain there are no gears in there.

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