The Art of Living Well

The Art of Living Well

by Guest Blogger November 01, 2018 3 Comments

Sculpture, found art pieces, pottery, and paintings on various mediums were nestled in every corner of the property from their family home, to a purpose-built workshop, to the vineyard itself. I saw in Annibale a great love for and patronage of the arts.

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Iceland Landscape

Iceland Landscape

by Ruminate Magazine October 31, 2018 2 Comments

Aaron McPeake's visual art "Iceland Landscape" appears in Issue No. 49: Mattering.

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Vampire on Dance Floor

Vampire on Dance Floor

by Guest Blogger October 31, 2018

Jess Turner's Poem "Vampire on Dance Floor" from Issue No. 48: Exposure

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Phantom Tears

Phantom Tears

by Guest Blogger October 30, 2018 3 Comments

My mother is alive. She’s floating toward me through the membranes of sleep. I don’t know if she is cognizant of this, if mom is in her own spiritual realm peering at me through jaded, tired eyes and desperately wanting to connect, or if it’s my own psychic energy trying to restore some sense of balance, who I am and where I’ve come from.  

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Wine and Miso

Wine and Miso

by Guest Blogger October 25, 2018 7 Comments

For a moment, both the cashier and I think this will be the end of the exchange, but the woman forges ahead: “My husband just died.” The cashier opens and closes his mouth a few times, like a goldfish, and then says, “I’m so sorry.”

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Layering Place: In Ourselves, in Our Writing

Layering Place: In Ourselves, in Our Writing

by Catherine Hervey October 23, 2018 4 Comments

When we write about people of our own creation, when we write fiction, there’s different work to do. We aren’t just noticing and deciding how to tell what we’ve noticed or experienced...We’re painting in those faint images and sensations ourselves, layering them onto more concrete descriptions of place and reality.

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What We've Been Looking For

What We've Been Looking For

by Guest Blogger October 18, 2018 1 Comment

Yes, the tethers of our bodies are linked like so many dandelion stems in a springtime wreath. Our tendons and muscles and bones are pieced together with the softer parts we’re made of, a promise of completion if we remember to weigh in the soul and the heart....

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A Year of No Buying: A Third Quarter Report

A Year of No Buying: A Third Quarter Report

by Susannah Pratt October 16, 2018 3 Comments

Today is my son Oliver’s high school orientation. As it happens, he will be attending my alma mater, a giant public high school that’s home to some of my favorite memories. This afternoon is therefore inducing in me a curious mixture of nostalgia and anticipation. 

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Autumn Rush

Autumn Rush

by Guest Blogger October 11, 2018 2 Comments

As September waltzes into October, nature extends an invitation for all to come outside and join in its pleasant song. And once you begin to notice its melody, fall takes its time to rise to a crescendo.

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foreign, or nyctophobia in twelve parts

foreign, or nyctophobia in twelve parts

by Guest Blogger October 09, 2018 1 Comment

I am so desperate to explain. I understand you!...It burns my mouth, the shameful logic my parents taught me. I’m Nigerian, not African-American. I am black, but not in that way.

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Love Note to Life: Keep Breathing, Believe it’s Enough

Love Note to Life: Keep Breathing, Believe it’s Enough

by Stefani Rossi October 04, 2018 6 Comments

In just over 3 months, I will become 3 years younger than my father was when he died without warning. The closer I get to that number, I am sobered by how young he was. Even more than that, I am sobered by how much he accomplished during his life, and—comparatively speaking—how much I have not.

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How to Lose a Friend

How to Lose a Friend

by Guest Blogger October 02, 2018 1 Comment

People lose friends all the time. I wonder if they ever give any thought to how they should. Or did they just look back one day and realize that person was gone and feel a simple sorrow because they never said goodbye?

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Survival as Neighbor-Love

Survival as Neighbor-Love

by Guest Blogger September 27, 2018 4 Comments

For the last sixteen months I have been occupied with the task of survival. I’ve been diagnosed with bipolar II, and the odds against my continuing to live are steep. Fifty percent of people with my condition will attempt suicide at least once. Fifty percent. That statistic is utterly daunting...

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Editors Ruminate: Exposure

Editors Ruminate: Exposure

by Kristin George Bagdanov September 25, 2018 3 Comments

The poems in this issue are in and of themselves exposures. They bring to light the unsaid, the repressed, the ignored and model how poetry itself is an act of exposure. The “I” unadorned and vulnerable exposes itself to damage, critique, and harm.

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Uncertainty

Uncertainty

by Guest Blogger September 20, 2018 2 Comments

I hear in the forecasters' voices how they hate, respect, how they cannot help but admire such a powerful, mesmerizing creature. I admire her, too. I'm not a good evacuee.

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Baby Shoes

Baby Shoes

by Guest Blogger September 18, 2018

A collection tells the story of the collector. A collection is a shoring up against the things that have gone missing. So much goes missing.

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I am Being Written

I am Being Written

by Ananda-mayi dasi September 13, 2018 2 Comments

When I talk with my friends..they often ask with trepidation, “But, are you still writing?” I think they’re really asking, “Are you still you?" Usually, I explain that I don’t have much time for writing now. The monastery is a busy place.

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A Meager Offering for the Heartbroken

A Meager Offering for the Heartbroken

by Guest Blogger September 11, 2018 3 Comments

When tragedy befalls, when the unthinkable has not only been thought, but has taken place, some of us reach into our store of platitudes casting about for protective incantations. Others dig into our pockets and purses for talismans to keep disaster at bay.

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Tomatoes: Heritage or Hate?

Tomatoes: Heritage or Hate?

by Guest Blogger September 06, 2018 2 Comments

Like a good Quaker, he set out to practice what he refused to preach, electing to, as Quakers say, let his life speak. He told me that fostering social change was like tending a garden. Plant love and that’s what you’ll harvest.

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Birdsong

Birdsong

by Guest Blogger September 04, 2018 3 Comments

I wonder how many other layers of reality I’m ignoring. How thin is the little layer of my attention? What are the trees saying? What is the sky saying?....birds seem to be calling me out of the human-words echo chamber entirely.

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Sacred Spaces

Sacred Spaces

by Guest Blogger August 30, 2018 2 Comments

Uncertainty remains. My womb may or may not be empty. I think of all the women who’ve sat on the toilet over the years, imagining that sacred space inside of them. Hoping one way. Hoping another.

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STORM SHELTERS

STORM SHELTERS

by Ruminate Magazine August 29, 2018 3 Comments

Bethany Maile's creative nonfiction "Storm Shelters" appears in Issue No. 48: Exposure.

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Friends for the Journey

Friends for the Journey

by Guest Blogger August 28, 2018 6 Comments

Luci is part of the legacy that is L’Engle’s body of work. Listening to the women who loved the real-life L’Engle reminisce, reminded me that the work of the artist is not, and cannot be done in isolation. She was a brilliant writer, yes. But she was also a grief-stricken mother, a loving grandmother, a loyal friend.

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Musings from a First-Generation Writer

Musings from a First-Generation Writer

by Guest Blogger August 23, 2018 4 Comments

“She would have checked out the book like a regular patron,” the narrator explained, “if only she had the proper documentation to get a library card. She cried when she got home, then began to read the book that night.” I didn’t take any more books from the library.

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Minya, Egypt: May 26, 2017

Minya, Egypt: May 26, 2017

by Ruminate Magazine August 22, 2018 3 Comments

Chaun Ballard's poem "Minya, Egypt: May 26, 2017" appears in Issue No. 48: Exposure.

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Dreaming in Swiss

Dreaming in Swiss

by Guest Blogger August 21, 2018 5 Comments

I’ve always found truth in dreams that I sometimes couldn’t find in real life. The life of a dream pulses on its own, as if all it needs to do in order to be is to project itself onto my being. Writing is akin to dreaming while awake. 

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How Ten Days of Silent Meditation Changed My Life

How Ten Days of Silent Meditation Changed My Life

by Guest Blogger August 16, 2018 1 Comment

Sadness passes, happiness is fleeting, and neither sustain your emotional health. Change is constant, and when I use breathing techniques it's easier to meditate on the idea that pain, sadness, ecstasy, and joy are only moments that also live and die.

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A Year of No Buying: A Second Quarter Report: In the Black

A Year of No Buying: A Second Quarter Report: In the Black

by Susannah Pratt August 14, 2018 2 Comments

In our house, 2018 is A Year of No Buying....I can’t say a bad word about it. And for the most part, my family feels the same. Or I thought they did. But then my husband went and bought a car. A gorgeous black luxury car that is, as he would like me to point out, a hybrid.

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Midsummer's Eve in Indiana

Midsummer's Eve in Indiana

by Guest Blogger August 09, 2018 1 Comment

My neighbor—an older woman I’d heard was a respected environmentalist in town—let her yard grow into this wild miniature forest. Her cats often peeked through the tiger lilies, their eyes wide as though they were continually surprised....I envied the ease with which she strolled through her yard, her dress like a comfortable pillowcase wrapped around her body, her hair gray and unkempt. 

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Reconciling Humility and Self-Worth in the Age of Ego

Reconciling Humility and Self-Worth in the Age of Ego

by Renee Long August 07, 2018 2 Comments

The light you will gather and spread in this world is uniquely tinted, and if you choose not to shine this light, in the words of the great Martha Graham, it would be lost to all of us. You are a child of creation. Shine what you have, and be brave.

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Mystery and Familiarity in Arches National Park

Mystery and Familiarity in Arches National Park

by Guest Blogger August 02, 2018 3 Comments

While entering Arches National Park, it is near impossible to stand beneath these natural rock formations and still be worried by the generalities of life. Life, as you have known it, is suddenly on pause. Your life transitions into snapshots as you wander the land in awe, feigning focus on putting one foot in front of the other while your eyes are bound to the monoliths that breach the sky.

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The Writing Impulse

The Writing Impulse

by Catherine Hervey July 31, 2018 6 Comments

I find I write a lot of stuff like this. Moments of humiliation, large and small. Attacks against which we are incapable of defending ourselves, for whatever reason. And here’s why: once they’re written down, they’re different. I’ve gotten addicted to the alchemy of writing, where those moments of pain and humiliation become beautiful and useful.

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The Worst Dog That Ever Dogged

The Worst Dog That Ever Dogged

by Guest Blogger July 26, 2018 1 Comment

 I grieve and yet I celebrate. My heart breaks and is stitched back together with the semi-toothless grin of a 5-year-old. I ache and yet I rejoice at all the gifts of the past 12 years, of who my family has become in that time.

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The Meaning is in the Waiting

The Meaning is in the Waiting

by Aaron Brown July 24, 2018 9 Comments

I’ve always thought of waiting as a passive thing. As a sign of inefficiency, uselessness, the lack of any sense of calling or progress....But what if waiting is a space we are led into, difficult as it might be? What if waiting is a lens, through which we actively engage with the world? 

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Finding a Vocabulary of the Heart: What Poetry Has Taught Me about Prayer

Finding a Vocabulary of the Heart: What Poetry Has Taught Me about Prayer

by Guest Blogger July 19, 2018 2 Comments

So if poetry, like all other art, is an aesthetic statement, how can it also be prayer?...All I know is that when I began to pen my laments, not only did the poems emerge as prayers, but these prayers were wilder, more daring, and more honest than any prayer I might have fumbled through on my knees. 

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