What Ruminate Gave Me

by Guest Blogger October 23, 2015

By Dave Harrity

When I first started writing poetry, I was a college student struggling to find kinship among my peers. I wrote contemplative poems; I wrote poems toward God. Most of my peers didn’t know what to make of them, however kind they were about them. And I didn’t know what to make of the absence of writerly peers whose work was trying to commune and express what mine was.

Enter Ruminate. I first came across the journal at my college, and was hooked. The tag line said clearly what I couldn’t: “Chewing on life, faith, and art.” That’s what I wanted my work to do. I had never articulated it before, but that was it. I wanted to “chew.”

I got up the courage to send some poems to them. In six months I had five that I thought were good enough. I sent them. They were rejected. But with a kind, handwritten note from the editor, Brianna Van Dyke, who encouraged me to send more work when I had some.

I worked and worked at other poems. Once they were ready, I sent them. A few months later, I heard back. Three poems had been accepted and I was elated.

Ruminate was the first magazine to pay attention to my work, to compensate me for my work, to artfully render my work, and put my work in the world. I’m thankful for them—for what they have done for me, and what they’ve done for the landscapes of faith, art, creativity, and Christian imagination.

I’m not the only author who feels this way. Many writers of faith from my generation have met through the pages of Ruminate—finding one another and building communities from there. Ruminate has helped us articulate our aesthetic—one where art and faith aren’t mutually exclusive, where the artist need not sacrifice quality, voice, content, or subject on the altar of religious or intellectual piety.

In the world of faith and creativity, a production like Ruminate’s is a rare thing—accessible, gorgeously printed and designed, and of consistent and provoking quality—which deserves the attention and support of faithful practitioners of art and artful practitioners of faith everywhere. But they’re struggling, and they need some help.

In the next 6 days, make a choice to stand with Ruminate, giving what you can, spreading the word, and showing support by sharing this message—or any other message from one of their supporters—so that we can help them get out of the red and allow them to continue making beautiful work!

Art matters to faith, and no one knows that better than Ruminate. Ruminate matters to faithful artists, and no one knows that better than me.

Get on it—make a pledge like me. Click here to donate now!




Guest Blogger
Guest Blogger

Author



Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Ruminate Blog

To be Lost in Space
To be Lost in Space

by Gyasi Byng July 20, 2017

Any honest PhD candidate will tell you that our work can be isolating. Even though a great deal of our work involves interaction (teaching, office hours, comparing notes with colleagues, attending lectures, and sometimes venting with other students about how we never have enough time), the majority of our work requires great stretches of time spent alone. 

Read More

Editors Ruminate: On the Poetry of Issue 43, Opening the Door
Editors Ruminate: On the Poetry of Issue 43, Opening the Door

by Kristin George Bagdanov July 14, 2017 1 Comment

I’ve always loved the etymology of kindness, which comes from kin—those to whom we are bound by choice or genealogy. And yet I often find kindness is most difficult to practice with my family—those who have witnessed just how unkind I can be.

Read More

Finding Space to Write
Finding Space to Write

by Jeremy B Jones July 05, 2017 2 Comments

Last summer, the book project I was in the midst of was mapped out on a drafting table in my writing space: sheets of paper with lists and quotes, photographs and maps, excerpts from 19th century books on gold mining. 

Read More