The Necessity of Ruminate Magazine

The Necessity of Ruminate Magazine

by Haley Littleton October 28, 2015

Ruminate: to think deeply, to ponder, to reconsider, to reevaluate, to mediate, to turn over every leaf and stone, to turn over in the mind.

To ruminate is to push past the boundaries towards truth and beauty.

To ruminate is to question and not fear the answers, to step out into the abyss trusting that there is solid ground.

To ruminate is to leap out into the void, like Denise Levertov, and trust that the Everlasting Arms will uphold you.

When I picked up my first copy of Ruminate Magazine, I felt I had finally found what I was looking for in a literary journal: a place where faith was taken seriously but not at the expense of poetic form and content.

Surrounded by a sea of trite, clichéd manifestations of Christianity, cheap words and cheesy tactics, I was desperate for expression that was serious and contemplative. I felt that I was asking questions that few around me were asking. And if I did, the response would usually be: I don’t know… Why does it matter?

Questions about writing, about art, about life, and about struggle filled the pages of my journal but rarely found community in the speech around me. Why complicate the truth? Why shroud it in aesthetic form? Just give it to me straight, no frills needed.

But what about those of us who love the frills of truth? Who love the complexity, the beauty of what we believe to be true?

This is the necessity of Ruminate Magazine.

My experience with Ruminate has helped me to grow exponentially as a writer: to not only write better but to confidently proclaim that I, too, am a writer and a writer desperate for the truth.

In my yearlong internship with Ruminate, running the blog and reading for contests, I interacted with talented writers with beautiful souls and was consistently challenged in my processes as an artist and a believer. I watched people wrestle through language with struggle, fear, doubt, and pain and come out beautifully on the other side.

I was able to push myself in my roles as critic, editor, and writer. I learned literary compassion, graciousness and humility from Editor-in-Chief Brianna Van Dyke and others at the magazine. I learned that literature is not a competition but, rather, a path towards communal beauty and growth.

People need a space to ruminate, and people need Ruminate Magazine. Ruminate strives to provide people with a place to not only publish their work but to wrestle with the world around us. This is a rarity in today’s literary climate and one that should be passionately preserved.

Please consider donating to Ruminate’s Art Matters Campaign so that the good fight for truth and beauty may continue. 



Haley Littleton
Haley Littleton

Author

Haley Littleton is a second year Master’s student at the University of Denver in Literary Studies. A former intern for Ruminate Magazine, Haley writes here and there between her studies and exploring. With an interest in environmental criticism, climbing, and love of craft beer, Haley finds it doubtful she will ever be pulled away from Colorado.



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