The Beauty of God Revealed: The Paintings of Nick Blosser

The Beauty of God Revealed: The Paintings of Nick Blosser

by Guest Blogger July 27, 2011

by Richard Cummings
Come with me on a country walk where the dark silhouettes of tree limbs reach out and embrace one another against a mysterious backlit canopy of oranges, reds, and pinks. Or, come with me to a land where similar trees stand as faithful sentinels to a dark oval pond. Ominous and ancient, the natural forms patiently yet humbly proclaim the latent beauty of the fallen world. This is the world revealed in the paintings of Nick Blosser.

 

Experience the world through Blosser's eyes. The Appalachian hills and overlooked fields of his adopted Tennessee present a lush, vivid, and mysterious “everyland.” Far from a sentimental experience of nature, Blosser peers more deeply, seeing beyond the outward forms, allowing us a glimpse of the spiritual essences of the rolling hills and countryside. The trees, the bushes and even the hills are filled with presence and beauty. Though his subject is northeast Tennessee, the world that Blosser reveals in his egg tempera and watercolor landscapes describe the subliminal mystery of every landscape. His work points to the “more” of existence and rejects the “only” of the superficial.

Blosser fuses the pallet and spatial realities of Milton Avery to the spiritual shimmerings of Charles Burchfield, forming a world where the divine is revealed in creation. A perceptive viewer of Blosser’s work is invited to revel in his visual Immanuel. God is truly with us, revealed and ever present in his fallen creation. The glimpses we are given cause us to yearn for the perfection that is to come. The beauty of God that Blosser exposes cannot be captured or communicated by a photograph or by any painstakingly representational artistic process.



He embraces the divine gift of shaping the world into a new creation, where deeper existence and truth are given tangible form in his colors, textures and shapes. And though one will not see the traditional trappings, subjects, and symbols of religion in his work, the pieces are profoundly and primally expressions of faith, formed by the hands of one who views the world through the lens of Christ. I invite you to perceptively explore the world as seen through the eyes of Nick Blosser. It is peaceful and mysterious but full of divine energy, providing a window for experiencing the subtle yet ever-present shimmer of God’s beauty in the world.

Nick Blosser has exhibited extensively throughout the country from New York City to Portland. He is a Professor of Art at Milligan College in northeast Tennessee. In 1985 he received the prestigious Rome Prize and was selected as a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome. He is represented by PDX Contemporary Art in Portland, Oregon.  http://pdxcontemporaryart.com/blosser

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Richard Cummings first became associated with Ruminate when his assemblage work appeared in Issue 19: Sustaining in March of 2011. He is easily distracted and enjoys sparkly things, things that move, and things with sugar. Still, Mr. Cummings finds time to write about art and time to be a professional artist, designer, and educator. He is an associate professor of art at College of the Ozarks and is also the director of the college's Boger Gallery.

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