Introducing Shane McCrae

by Ruminate Magazine April 01, 2017

We are incredibly pleased to announce that Shane McCrae is serving as the finalist judge for our 2017 Janet B. McCabe Poetry Prize. 

NPR recently called his forthcoming book In the Language of My Captor a book to watch for in 2017: “Shane McCrae is the rare poet whose incredible productivity matches his raw talent and the growing appetite for his work. Almost annually, McCrae puts out a book of poems as necessary as the news.”

Poet Shane McCrae grew up in Texas and California. The first in his family to graduate from college, McCrae earned a BA at Linfield College, an MA at the University of Iowa, an MFA at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and a JD at Harvard Law School. McCrae is the author of several poetry collections, including Mule (2011), Blood (2013), and The Animal Too Big to Kill (2015); his work has also been featured in The Best American Poetry 2010, edited by Amy Gerstler. His honors include a Whiting Writers’ Award and a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. McCrae teaches in the low-residency MFA program at Spalding University and at Oberlin College. Read Shane's full profile here. 

 

 

 



(Enter the contest by May 15, 2017. Winners will be announced Mid-July. Full guidelines can be found here. View last year's winner and finalists here. )




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