Sanctuaries

Sanctuaries

by Guest Blogger December 26, 2017

Sanctuaries explores the places in which the spiritual and the human can touch….A sanctuary is thought of being solely for the sacred and the pious but it is also for the ordinary. The images that surround the idea of spirituality in American Christianity are articulated through very traditional symbolism and behaviors. This work challenges this practice by studying the way in which light interacts with mundane spaces and objects.

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The Dare of Hope and the Weight of Glory

The Dare of Hope and the Weight of Glory

by Stefani Rossi December 12, 2017 2 Comments

In week 1 of Advent, the meditation is hope. The invitation extended by readings, songs, and rituals is to dig deep and embrace hope as a way of thinking, of living, of breathing in the world....This year, as I ponder the theme of hope, I cannot escape the reality that our world is living through intense tension. 

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Guesswork

Guesswork

by Guest Blogger December 07, 2017 1 Comment

I fear that with all this technological help we are unwittingly eroding two critical dimensions of the human experience: error and aspiration. This is worrisome because failure and hope are the very things have propelled human progress to date...Every major breakthrough rests on the back of the hundreds of thousands of errors that came before.

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Music to Reorder the World: A Song of Thanksgiving

Music to Reorder the World: A Song of Thanksgiving

by Guest Blogger November 21, 2017 1 Comment

For Beethoven, the wisdom of his final years is gained only after intense suffering...In this luminous movement, the mystical stasis of the chorale, sharply contrasted by the fast section, eventually gives way to an intense climax. While this reminds us of his struggle, the ethereal ending of the movement tells us that Beethoven is already looking past the pain.

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Why Use Meditation and Mindfulness When You're Writing Important Academic Work?

Why Use Meditation and Mindfulness When You're Writing Important Academic Work?

by Guest Blogger November 14, 2017

As you wrestle with your Major Work, do you crave less anxiety, more confidence, better work flow, even real answers to all those knotty quandaries? In my academic coaching practice, I’ve found that many dissertation/thesis candidates “use” the spiritual to help them through the purgatory of academic writing. And I encourage them, primarily in two ways, meditation and mindfulness.

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Road Trip

Road Trip

by Guest Blogger November 09, 2017 4 Comments

We still scour passing trucks for license plates, aiming to spot all 50 states and some of the provinces before arriving in the mountains. We still read aloud from terrible joke books to pass the time. But I can’t help the feeling that the riddles and Twenty Questions are barely able to compete with Clash of Clans. Boredom is much harder to justify, “just look out the window,” a tougher sell.

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Coming Together: On Neighbors, Fences, and Moments

Coming Together: On Neighbors, Fences, and Moments

by Judith Dupree November 07, 2017 3 Comments

Who, existentially, is my neighbor, and what does it imply, or not, in my larger life beyond my front porch? Do I owe something more than I have given to this unfathomable, unreasonable world? Do I gain something more than I have wanted, or ever missed?

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Given

Given

by Guest Blogger November 02, 2017 1 Comment

...truth be told, this field offers nothing worth my time, has no economic value, is not going to end anyone’s suffering, is not going to bring down a tyrant, and I would be better off focusing on the efficiency of my day, the tasks, that which I can control in this little world of mine...

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On Finding the Birds

On Finding the Birds

by Jeremy B Jones October 24, 2017 3 Comments

Beyond my grandma’s living room, I talked to the birds, often to birds unseen. Some calls were easier to imitate than others. The bobwhite sang back most consistently, once I finally managed a passable whistle and could parrot its low opening note that quickly slides upward. In hayfields and from meadowed hills, I called out—the low bob, the high white—and it called back.

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At Risk

At Risk

by Guest Blogger October 19, 2017 1 Comment

I start over, trying different tricks, until I can prop each bloom in a semi-erect position. How ridiculous. I know it will be useless. I am perfectly conscious of setting up a sad masquerade. What is this pathetic comedy for? My own sake, I guess. These sunflowers are in agony, maybe already dead, but I have to pretend I’m doing the impossible to rescue them. I’m doing it, no matter the cost.

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Editors Ruminate: On the Poetry of Issue 44, Small

Editors Ruminate: On the Poetry of Issue 44, Small

by Kristin George Bagdanov October 03, 2017 4 Comments

Smallness can be the glitch in the system, the wrench in the machine. It can also be a line of poetry that reconfigures how we see the world. An image that unlocks something new. The poems in this issue explore the many implications and iterations of small...

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Discovering Wilderness in the City

Discovering Wilderness in the City

by Angela Doll Carlson September 19, 2017

I make it a point on this walk to find nature, identify and tag it silently, like an urban anthropologist. It feels like progress. It feels, perhaps, like a down payment on the benefits I’d get from a day in the woods, a week in the mountains, or a night beside the ocean. It’s not the woods, but maybe it’s close enough, I think.

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Rest and Wakefulness

Rest and Wakefulness

by Charnell Peters July 25, 2017 3 Comments

There is strength in new beginnings and strength in coming awake. I’m grateful to join the Ruminate team as blog editor, because I want to learn how to better wake up, and I am excited to do that with you.

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Brian Doyle on How Light and Dark are Lovers

Brian Doyle on How Light and Dark are Lovers

by Brianna Van Dyke June 15, 2017 1 Comment

Brian Doyle, beloved writer, editor, and Ruminate contributor, passed away from complications related to a brain tumor on May 27th. 

We are so grateful for all the grace and playfulness and tenderness and gut-wrenching truth that Brian shared through his writing. 

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Minimalism, Mindfulness, and Movement

Minimalism, Mindfulness, and Movement

by Renee Long June 01, 2017

Twice in the last five years, I moved across the country. The first time was from Florida to Portland, Oregon. The next time, and most recently, from Portland to San Diego. Both times, I sold my things and packed only what I could fit in my Suzuki. Both times were a burning cleanse.

 

 

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Creative Lives Part 3

Creative Lives Part 3

by Guest Blogger May 10, 2017

I'm thrilled that they've allowed us to share their conversation with you in this series titled "Creative Lives." You can read part 1 and part 2 here. In this installment Julie and Melissa talk about the particulars of their creative process and the necessary blessing of having readers contribute to the narrative.

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On the Poetry of “Forming One Another”

On the Poetry of “Forming One Another”

by Kristin George Bagdanov April 20, 2017 3 Comments

Lately there has been much talk of bubbles, walls, and divisions—forms we conjure to perpetuate the myth of isolation and individualism: that we can live our lives unaffected by others, gatekeepers of our own private kingdoms. But bodies and borders are porous;

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How Can We Be Silent?

How Can We Be Silent?

by Gyasi Byng March 28, 2017

I’ve been thinking about silence. What role should silence play in our everyday lives? What should be a Christian’s relationship to quiet? Personally, I thrive on silence. Noise and chatter are grating to me. Quiet is therapeutic. When I sit still, be quiet, and remain silent, I’m able to sort through the chaos of my thoughts...

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Review of Catherine Abbey Hodges, Instead of Sadness

Review of Catherine Abbey Hodges, Instead of Sadness

by Guest Blogger March 22, 2017 2 Comments

Teeming with imagery and intelligence, Catherine Abbey Hodges’s Instead of Sadness(Gunpowder Press, 2016) is as much a collection of moments as of poetry. With dovelike gentleness, each piece rests on the thoughts and images of a particular moment, held aloft by the layeredness of meaning that makes up the...

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The Do-Over Year

The Do-Over Year

by Aaron Brown March 09, 2017 2 Comments

Much has been written in the wake of 2016 of our need for empathy in light of the losses and difficulty of last year. It seemed like every time I checked the news someone significant had died, some mass-casualty tragedy had struck, or the endless splintering of our society during the political season was splitting deeper, hurting more. 

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The Anatomy of Aging (or, The Best Year Ever!)

The Anatomy of Aging (or, The Best Year Ever!)

by Angela Doll Carlson February 14, 2017 3 Comments

In about eight months, I’ll turn fifty. I didn’t think it bothered me all that much. Aging and the ascending number on the pull-down menus were just a nuisance more than anything else but this past year I’ve been noticing the ticking clock, the changing calendar.

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Seeing Sideways

Seeing Sideways

by Judith Dupree February 01, 2017 2 Comments

It was raining again when I walked out of church—a slow spritz that would invoke a guffaw in the saturated Northeast. But in Southern California it was, Oh yay, rain! I smiled, raised my umbrella, and headed across the street. And I saw him standing there. A robust young man. Facing the church, holding a cardboard "help" sign.

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5 Favorite Blog Posts to Revisit in 2017

5 Favorite Blog Posts to Revisit in 2017

by Renee Long January 14, 2017

As the Ruminate blog editor, I get to read a lot of exceptional work, but in the New Year, I find it important to pause and revisit my favorite pieces of writing. With so many beautiful articles, it's difficult to narrow down my favorite Ruminate blog posts. 

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Naked Soul

Naked Soul

by Aaron Brown December 23, 2016 1 Comment

Maybe you’re like me: at the end of a long day of working, of being constantly “on” and exhausted of what little energy you had at the day’s beginning, you find yourself lying in bed or sitting in that lamp lit chair, book in hand, staring at a page. But as you try and read, you can’t help but think back on all the conversations you had...

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