Ruminate's Psalms

by Guest Blogger May 19, 2010

[P]oetry is important. Poetry enables a person to think about the world indirectly, through metaphor and image, using emotionally rich and concentrated language. There is a place for prose, of course--for the direct explanation of things--just as there is a place for the Epistle to the Romans in a person's study of the Christian faith.But in an hour of grief or ecstatic celebration, we need psalms and parables to soak and seep into our lives, as much if not more than we need an "explanation" of things. In fact, poetry is some of our most profound theology. You don't have to think about the Trinity for long, for example, before resorting to something like poetry to explain it. We know this to be true, even if we don't often acknowledge it. What's great is that Ruminate supplies some of these psalms, and enables people who can acknowledge our most "profound theology" to do their work in a way that blesses many. In fact, it's likely if you're reading this, you've benefitted from reading them yourself. But as important as this is, there's more. You may not have known this, but Ruminate is one of the rare publications that advances the writing of *new* poetry. There are others who do so, of course, but none with Ruminate's unique focus on the lesser appreciated facets of believing the gospel of grace and living a life of faith. That delight in, acceptance of, and sometimes uncomfortable peace with the mystery and irony of life. Ruminate needs your help. Our goal is to raise three thousand dollars by May 28th. This will be enough to publish our next issue. Think about it this way: Ruminate typically publishes twelve to fourteen poets every issue, and at least a couple of them have never been published before. This is a tremendous accomplishment. By bringing into print the artistry and imagery of these poets, Ruminate is actually adding to the body of creative expression in the world today--a world many of us would agree suffers for dullness and boredom for its appalling dearth of such work. So, a lot is at stake. We need your help. Here's an idea. Consider making a gift of twenty five dollars. In terms of "per-line" impact, this will pay for one stanza of a poem. Fifty will pay for two; and a hundred dollar gift will pay for the publishing of an entire poem. So, just as you've benefitted from Ruminate's releasing some of the poetry of God in our generation, so also you can acknowledge your benefit in a tangible way. Take a moment to give toward our next issue. You're important, and your vision and passion make this artistic and theologically poetic dream a reality.


Guest Blogger
Guest Blogger

Author



Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Ruminate Blog

Rest and Wakefulness
Rest and Wakefulness

by Charnell Peters July 25, 2017

There is strength in new beginnings and strength in coming awake. I’m grateful to join the Ruminate team as blog editor, because I want to learn how to better wake up, and I am excited to do that with you.

Read More

To be Lost in Space
To be Lost in Space

by Gyasi Byng July 20, 2017

Any honest PhD candidate will tell you that our work can be isolating. Even though a great deal of our work involves interaction (teaching, office hours, comparing notes with colleagues, attending lectures, and sometimes venting with other students about how we never have enough time), the majority of our work requires great stretches of time spent alone. 

Read More

Editors Ruminate: On the Poetry of Issue 43, Opening the Door
Editors Ruminate: On the Poetry of Issue 43, Opening the Door

by Kristin George Bagdanov July 14, 2017 1 Comment

I’ve always loved the etymology of kindness, which comes from kin—those to whom we are bound by choice or genealogy. And yet I often find kindness is most difficult to practice with my family—those who have witnessed just how unkind I can be.

Read More