On Winning the Kalos Art Prize

On Winning the Kalos Art Prize

June 19, 2018

By Eloisa Guanlao

Receiving the Kalos Art Prize is about sharing my childhood and my father’s story to a wider, introspective audience. My father, who passed away six years ago, was a very spiritual person. A contemplative follower of the Judeo-Christian tradition, he also studied and delved into other faiths. We had many lengthy and rousing discussions about different religions. Ruminate is a publication he would have appreciated.

The Noli Me Tangere images published in Ruminate show the Filipino sights and textures that made up my childhood–from jeepneys to religious processions. The Kalos Art Prize offered me a way to announce the deep and heartfelt relationship I have with my extended family in my birth country. Countless aunties, uncles, cousins and friends in the Philippines, many of whom took part in creating the project, are proud and overjoyed to see themselves and aspects of Filipino culture presented so beautifully and thoughtfully. I share the Kalos Art Prize with so many individuals in Panapaan, Philippines. Gaining support and being recognized for one’s passion and effort as an artist are encouraging and uplifting.

 





Still from Noli Me Tangere, 2017-Present (In-Progress), Digital Documentary.


 
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Eloisa Guanlao is a multi-disciplinary artist and scholar. She attended Carleton College in Minnesota, California State University in Long Beach, the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, and LACHSA for her art and art history training.





Work from Eloisa Guanlao's Noli Me Tangere was selected by finalist judge Steve Prince for first place in Ruminate's 2018 Kalos Visual Art Prize. This work and more appear in Issue No. 46: A Way Through.



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